China

Dongguan

Dongguan, China

Dongguan, China

In July 2002, I boarded a Turbojet ferry from Hong Kong with my mom and a long-time friend, bound for mainland China across the South China Sea. It was my first time to visit the mainland, after having been to Hong Kong (a British territory that was handed back to China in 1997) and Taiwan (Republic of China) several times. We arrived in Dongguan, a city in the Canton province. It’s almost like a gateway between mainland China and HK because there’s a lot of travel between the two places, and people speak Cantonese in both (though the accent is a little different). I don’t have any recommendations on specific places to see in Dongguan because I spent only half a day there, but I can tell you about my experience.

jewelry gold-plating factory

jewelry gold-plating factory

My mom’s friend owns a jewelry gold-plating factory in this city of close to 8 million people. As with any other factory, young people, predominantly women in this one, were hard at work churning out rings dipped in 24k gold. A lot of other industrial plants line the area, where life is slower than in the bigger cities of China. Funny, this city of 8 million isn’t considered that big in the world’s most populous nation! Most people ride bicycles and motorcycles (we rode one), buzzing through the otherwise quiet streets. People take afternoon naps at their fruit stands in the open-air market, as customers browse. Speaking of food, red-bean-and-milk slushie drinks are refreshing on a hot, summer day. I had one at a cafe. And Chinese food is cheap.

In the not-too-distant future, I plan to spend a few weeks traveling across the vast, diverse land of China, where you can find extremes in weather, food, sizes of people, urban-rural life, buildings, and everything else. It’s an amazing country, as demonstrated in the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, especially in the Opening Ceremony. It’s full of history, some of it personal. My mother was born in mainland China before fleeing with her family to Hong Kong when she was a baby because the Communists took over and my grandpa (my mom’s dad) was an adviser to the Nationalist leader, Chiang Kai Shek. My father’s parents had moved from the mainland to HK earlier, so my dad was born in HK.